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Over 89 million Nigerians lack access to electricity supply ~W/Bank, IEA

By Oludare Mayowa

About 45 percent of Nigeria population still lack access to electricity supply despite billions of dollar spent to improve energy supply in the West African country in the last twenty years.

According to a report by five global institutions, including the World Bank and International Energy Agency (IEA), only 111.33 million Nigerians have access to electricity, leaving over 89.63 million people without access.

The report stated that the bulk of those without electricity access dwells in the rural area, as it estimated that 73.08 million people without access to electricity dwell in rural area while only 16.55 million people without access to electricity dwell in the urban areas.

In the report, only 33 percent of Nigerians have access to clean cooking energy while the remaining make do with whatever they have to carry out their cooking.

The bulk of Nigerians still depend largely on felling trees and crude way of gathering material for their cooking.

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Meanwhile, the report stated that an estimated 660 million people would still lack access to electricity supply by 2030, while most of them are in Sub-Saharan Africa.

It said a greater share of the global population gained access to electricity than ever before, the report said the number of people without electricity in Sub-Saharan Africa actually increased.

It said unless efforts are scaled up significantly in countries with the largest deficits the world will still fall short of ensuring universal access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy by 2030

The report said though, since 2010, more than a billion have gained access to electricity, 759 million people still live without electricity.

It said about half of those without access to electricity live in fragile and conflict affected settings.

“Despite accelerated progress in recent years, the SDG target of universal access by 2030 appears unlikely to be met, leaving an estimated 660 million without electricity, especially if the COVID-19 pandemic seriously disrupts electrification efforts.

“Regional disparities continue to persist, and the access deficit is particularly concentrated in Sub-Saharan Africa, which accounts for three-quarters of the global deficit,” the report stated.

The report also showed that while Latin America and the Caribbean, Eastern Asia and Southeastern Asia are approaching universal access, with more than 98 percent of their population having electricity access, in Sub-Saharan Africa, less than half of the population has access to electricity.

“Among the 20 countries with the largest access deficits, Bangladesh, Kenya, and Uganda showed the greatest improvement since 2010, thanks to annual electrification growth rates in excess of 3 percentage points, driven largely by an integrated approach that combined grid, mini grid and on-grid solar electrification.”

Since 2010, more than a billion people have gained access to electricity. As a result, 90 percent of the planet’s population was connected in 2019.

Yet 759 million people still live without electricity, with about half of them living in fragile and conflict-affected settings.

Despite accelerated progress in recent years, the SDG target of universal access by 2030 appears unlikely to be met, leaving an estimated 660 million without electricity, especially if the COVID-19 pandemic seriously disrupts electrification efforts.

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